Locations & Hours

Main Library
276-676-6233

MON - THU 9 a.m. - 8 p.m.
FRI & SAT 9 a.m.
SUN 2 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Damascus Library
276-475-3820

MON, WED, FRI 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
TUE & THU 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
SAT 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
SUN closed

Glade Spring Library
276-429-5626

MON closed
TUE & THU 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
WED & FRI 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SAT 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
SUN closed

Hayters Gap Library
276-944-4442

MON closed
TUE & THU 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
WED & FRI 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SAT 9am - 1 p.m.
SUN closed

Mendota Library
276-645-2374

MON closed
TUE - THU 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
FRI closed
SAT 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
SUN closed


What’s Happening

Posted November 14th, 2017 in Uncategorized

eventsJust because The Big Read is over doesn’t mean that there isn’t a plethora of activities going on at your library.

Story time is held Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays at the main library and every other Wednesday at the Glade and Mendota branches. STEM programs, teen book club, crafternoons and more are happening around the system. You can check out the schedule here.

Did you know that when you check the upcoming events calendar on our website, you can filter it so that it only shows particular types of events or only events at your nearest library? Just click on Filter Events and make your choices. You can also tell what type of event a calendar entry is by the color coding. Kids and Teens events are blue. Classes are yellow, movies are red, etc.

The Glade Spring branch library holds an afternoon of Xbox gaming for teens on Thursdays from 4-6 p.m. Join us for some great games in the new teen center at that branch. It also has lots of video editing equipment for fun and school.

Lots of movies are upcoming, several of them are special for Thanksgiving. For example, the Damascus library has its senior movie Nov. 15 at noon. The main library shows “Yours, Mine and Ours: Nov. 17 at 2 p.m. “Charlie Brown’s Thanksgiving” is shown at main at 11 a.m., Nov. 20 and “Free Birds” is shown at 11 a.m., Nov. 21.

There is a great series of Healthy Living events at the Glade Spring library. What’s For Dinner is Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. and Stress Management is Nov. 30 at 6 p.m. This series continues throughout December with plenty of tips for how to cope with holiday stress.

Be sure to join us Sunday, Nov. 19 at 3 p.m., when Dr. Jennifer Murray visits the main library to talk about “What it Takes to be a Hero: American Soldiers and Commemorating the Vietnam War.” This is the last event in our celebration of veterans. The talk explores American soldiers in Vietnam, how they understood their experience and how we remember and commemorate those soldiers and the war itself. Dr. Murray is an assistant professor of history at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise.

 

 


Fantasia and More

Posted October 26th, 2017 in Uncategorized

DragonWe’ve really enjoyed The Big Read so far, and one of our most anticipated events is this weekend – “Fantasia.”

 

If you’ve ever heard the Symphony of the Mountains, then you know that you’re in for a treat. If you haven’t, then you are truly missing out on a wonderful experience. Sunday, Oct. 29 at 3 p.m., they’ll be performing at the McGlothlin Center for the Arts at Emory & Henry College. They are paying tribute to fantasy music by performing parts of  “Fantasia.”

Many adults remember the sense of wonder when they first experienced “Fantasia” as children. We will re-create that magical feeling for a new generation of children, as we bring a live symphony together with movie clips from the Disney classic films “Fantasia” and “Fantasia 2000.”

Featured guests include The Rebel Voices Chorus and Chamber Choir, David Carroll, Director; Patrick Henry High School Wind Ensemble, Pete W. Marcum, Director; Allyss Haecker, Soprano and Lisa Withers, Piano.

In addition to the concert, there will be an instrument petting zoo and music and book displays. Children can also build a fantasy instrument, such as a mushroom drum.

Use some of our props – or come in costume – in the photo booth.

In addition to music from “Fantasia,” they’ll perform music from “Frozen” and “ET” and other  fantastic selections, such as Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue.”

The concert is free for students and $20 for adults. To get tickets, visit the symphony’s website.

Movies

The Fantasy Film Festival continues at the Abingdon Cinemall Monday, Oct. 30 with “Cinderella.” A girl named Ella (Cinderella) has the purest heart living in a cruel world filled with evil stepsisters and an evil stepmother out to ruin Ella’s life. Ella comes one with her pure heart when she meets the prince and dances her way to a better life with glass shoes, and a little help from her fairy godmother, of course. A live-action retelling of the classic fairy tale about a servant stepdaughter who is abused by her jealous stepmother and stepsisters after her father died. Bring your library card and it’s free. If you don’t have a library card, we’ll be there to issue you one.

The Mendota library is showing “Wonder Woman” Oct. 27 at 6 p.m.

Hawks & Raptors

Join us at the main library, Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. for a presentation by Ron Harrington and Michael Sanders.

They will share their photographs and descriptions of the habitat and behavior of the hawks that are permanent residents of the region and of the species that migrate through the region on an 8,000-mile-trek to South America.

This trek is part of a major fall migration of hawks over the Clinch Mountains in Mendota that brings the region notoriety in the world of ornithology. In one day, hundreds of hawks pass over the Mendota Fire Tower, traveling up to 200 miles per day.

Halloween

We’ve got loads of treats for Halloween this year. Zombies and Clue and plain old-fashioned fun.

The main library’s celebration is Thursday, Oct. 26 at 6:30 p.m. Put on your costumes and join us for treats. Our staff will be in costume, too.

We’re also having our popular pumpkin decorating contest. Kids should bring their completed pumpkin entries by 6:15 p.m. for judging. The winners will be announced at 7 p.m. Pumpkins may be carved or painted. Carved pumpkins are judged in most original, scariest and silliest categories; painted pumpkins are judged separately.

The Glade Spring branch library is celebrating Saturday, Oct. 28 from 7-9 p.m., with a special treat just for teens – Zombie Fever: The Escape Game.

Use your library and book knowledge to collect clues to escape the zombie-infested library … before time runs out. Prizes and special awards are given to those who succeed. If you fail – welcome to the infestation.

This event is for ages 13-17. This is an after-hours program and requires a permission slip and registration. Free and open to the public.

Wear comfortable clothing. If you are allergic to face paint, please let us know.

The Damascus branch library is hosting a special “Clue” party Oct. 31 from 4-6 p.m.  Dress as Colonel Mustard, Miss Scarlet or any of their cohorts, play Clue at the library and get your treats.

All the branch libraries will offer treats on Halloween from 5-7 p.m.

Other programs

Guy Briggs tries to answer the question, “Is your favorite song magical?” Friday, Oct. 27 at 1:30 p.m., at the main library. A Fantasy Craft program is held at the main library Saturday, Oct. 28 at 11 a.m., and a Fantasy Lego program is held at the Damascus library at 11 a.m., the same day.

The Teen Book Club meets at the Glade Spring branch library Oct. 31 at 4 p.m.

Come and join us in this celebration of all things fantasy. NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest.

 

 


More Big Read Excitement

Posted October 18th, 2017 in Uncategorized

DragonI hope you’ve been enjoying The Big Read celebration. We’ve got more excitement coming up. If you’ve ever wanted to write the great American novel or a short story or if you’re just curious about how writers do it, join us at the main library Saturday, Oct. 21 at 1 p.m. Mark Baumgartner, creative writing professor at ETSU, will be here.

If working with your hands is more your style, check out the Clay Dragon Sculpture workshop at William King Museum of Art, Oct. 21 at 1 p.m. You’ll use different sculpting techniques to create your very own dragon out of clay. It’s free and open to the public.

Linda Stanley leads an Upcycled Book Workshop Oct. 21 at 11 a.m. at the Glade Spring branch library. Bring out your inner artist during this program, where you’ll learn ways to turn old books into something fantastic. Free and all supplies are provided.

Movies

The Fantasy Film Festival continues at the Abingdon Cinemall Monday, Oct. 23 with “Maleficent.” A beautiful, pure-hearted young woman, Maleficent has an idyllic life growing up in a peaceable forest kingdom, until one day when an invading army threatens the harmony of the land. Maleficent rises to be the land’s fiercest protector, but she ultimately suffers a ruthless betrayal – an act that begins to turn her pure heart to stone. Bent on revenge, Maleficent faces a battle with the invading king’s successor and, as a result, places a curse upon his newborn infant Aurora. Bring your library card and it’s free. If you don’t have a library card, we’ll be there to issue you one.

We’ve got several other movies for you to enjoy this week. The Glade Spring library is showing “Beetlejuice” Oct. 19 at 6 p.m. and “Beauty and the Beast” is at the Hayters Gap library the same date at 4 p.m.

“City of Ember” is shown at the main library Friday, Oct. 20 at 1 p.m.

Other programs

The Damascus branch library hosts an Essential Oils program Tuesday, Oct. 24 at 4 p.m. A pumpkin painting program is held at Hayters Gap branch library Oct. 24 at 4 p.m. Fantasy craft programs are held at main Oct. 23, 24 and 25 during regular hours.

Glade Spring is holding a Meditation program Oct. 26 at 6 p.m.

Book Discussions

Talking about books is fun! Some people might think it’s intimidating, but it’s the same as telling a friend what you liked about a book – or what you didn’t like. We’re having book discussions at all our libraries, so come and join one. You might even make a new friend – book readers are an interesting group. If you are one of those people who likes to prepare, check out the online resources the NEA offers. You’ll find information about the book, the author, discussion questions, reader resources, teacher’s guide and more.

Book discussion dates include

  • Oct. 18 at 6 p.m. at the main library
  • Oct. 19 at 1 p.m. at the main library
  • Oct 24 at 4 p.m. at the Glade Spring branch library
  • Oct. 25 at 4 p.m. at the Mendota branch library
  • Oct. 26 at 5 p.m. at the Damascus branch library

If you’re a teen and want to talk about the book, check out the Teen Book Club at the Glade Spring branch library. They meet Tuesdays at 4 p.m.

Kids

We have special Big Read story times, LEGOs and crafts for kids at all our libraries. Check out the calendar for specific times and locations.

You can see videos of our Kick-off and the talk by Charles Vess on our YouTube channel. Click on the links to watch.

 

 

 

 


More Big Read Excitement

Posted October 18th, 2017 in Uncategorized

DragonI hope you’ve been enjoying The Big Read celebration. We’ve got more excitement coming up.

If you’ve ever wanted to write the great American novel or a short story or if you’re just curious about how writers do it, join us at the main library Saturday, Oct. 21 at 1 p.m. Mark Baumgartner, creative writing professor at ETSU, will be here.

If working with your hands is more your style, check out the Clay Dragon Sculpture workshop at William King Museum of Art, Oct. 21 at 1 p.m. You’ll use different sculpting techniques to create your very own dragon out of clay. It’s free and open to the public.

Linda Stanley leads an Upcycled Book Workshop Oct. 21 at 11 a.m. at the Glade Spring branch library. Bring out your inner artist during this program, where you’ll learn ways to turn old books into something fantastic. Free and all supplies are provided.

Movies

The Fantasy Film Festival continues at the Abingdon Cinemall Monday, Oct. 23 with “Maleficent.” A beautiful, pure-hearted young woman, Maleficent has an idyllic life growing up in a peaceable forest kingdom, until one day when an invading army threatens the harmony of the land. Maleficent rises to be the land’s fiercest protector, but she ultimately suffers a ruthless betrayal – an act that begins to turn her pure heart to stone. Bent on revenge, Maleficent faces a battle with the invading king’s successor and, as a result, places a curse upon his newborn infant Aurora. Bring your library card and it’s free. If you don’t have a library card, we’ll be there to issue you one.

We’ve got several other movies for you to enjoy this week. The Glade Spring library is showing “Beetlejuice” Oct. 19 at 6 p.m. and “Beauty and the Beast” is at the Hayters Gap library the same date at 4 p.m.

“City of Ember” is shown at the main library Friday, Oct. 20 at 1 p.m.

Other programs

The Damascus branch library hosts an Essential Oils program Tuesday, Oct. 24 at 4 p.m. A pumpkin painting program is held at Hayters Gap branch library Oct. 24 at 4 p.m. Fantasy craft programs are held at main Oct. 23, 24 and 25 during regular hours.

Glade Spring is holding a Meditation program Oct. 26 at 6 p.m.

Book Discussions

Talking about books is fun! Some people might think it’s intimidating, but it’s the same as telling a friend what you liked about a book – or what you didn’t like. We’re having book discussions at all our libraries, so come and join one. You might even make a new friend – book readers are an interesting group. If you are one of those people who likes to prepare, check out the online resources the NEA offers. You’ll find information about the book, the author, discussion questions, reader resources, teacher’s guide and more.

Book discussion dates include

  • Oct. 18 at 6 p.m. at the main library
  • Oct. 19 at 1 p.m. at the main library
  • Oct 24 at 4 p.m. at the Glade Spring branch library
  • Oct. 25 at 4 p.m. at the Mendota branch library
  • Oct. 26 at 5 p.m. at the Damascus branch library

If you’re a teen and want to talk about the book, check out the Teen Book Club at the Glade Spring branch library. They meet Tuesdays at 4 p.m.

Kids

We have special Big Read story times, LEGOs and crafts for kids at all our libraries. Check out the calendar for specific times and locations.

You can see videos of our Kick-off and the talk by Charles Vess on our YouTube channel. Click on the links to watch.

 

 

 

 


Big Read Fun

Posted October 10th, 2017 in Uncategorized

DragonWe had a blast at the Kick-off and Charles Vess was fascinating as usual, and The Big Read fun continues. If you’d like to see what we’ve been doing, click the links at the beginning of this sentence. They’ll take you to our YouTube channel. Keep reading for what’s coming up.

Workshops

New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Estep will be at the main library Saturday, Oct. 14 at 2 p.m. to talk about World Building. Fascinating idea, isn’t it? After you’ve come up with your characters and figured out what it is they’re going to be doing, they still have to have a place to live. Even if it’s a fictional town based on your hometown, you have to know what it looks like, what businesses are in the town, who else lives there, etc., etc., etc. If you’re creating a new place, you have to decide what kind of place it is first. Jennifer creates wonderful worlds for her characters to inhabit, and she’ll talk about the trick of the trade and answer your questions. After her talk, she’ll have books for sale.

If you’d rather work with your hands, we’ve got a treat for you at William King Museum of Art – Build a Fairy House workshop. You’ll learn to create a Fairy House fit for Titania. For this family friendly fantasy workshop, participants search the museum grounds for sticks, leaves, flowers and other interesting, magical objects. You’ll then use what you find to construct a home built for a fairy. This workshop is free.

Movies

It’s hard to believe but this year is the 10th anniversary of the release of Stardust,” which Abingdon’s own Charles Vess helped to create. The movie is based on a graphic novel written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Charles. Join us Monday, Oct. 16 at 7 p.m., at Abingdon Cinemall to watch the movie. We’ll also be watching some fun extras. Bring your library card and it’s free. If you don’t have a library card, we’ll be there to issue you one.

We’ve got several other movies for you to enjoy this week. The Damascus library is showing “Tuck Everlasting” Oct. 12 at 4 p.m. and “Labyrinth” is at the Glade Spring library the same date at 5 p.m.

“Big Fish” is shown at the main library Friday, Oct. 13 at 1 p.m. and “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword” is shown in Mendota at 6 p.m.

Book Discussions

Talking about books is fun! Some people think it’s intimidating, but it’s the same as telling a friend what you liked about a book – or what you didn’t like. We’re having book discussions at all our libraries, so come and join one. You might even make a new friend – book readers are an interesting group. If you are one of those people who likes to prepare, check out the online resources the NEA offers. You’ll find information about the book, the author, discussion questions, reader resources, teacher’s guide and more.

Our first book discussion is at the Hayters Gap branch library, Oct. 12 at 3:30 p.m.

Other book discussion dates include

  • Oct. 18 at 6 p.m. at the main library
  • Oct. 19 at 1 p.m. at the main library
  • Oct 24 at 4 p.m. at the Glade Spring branch library
  • Oct. 25 at 4 p.m. at the Mendota branch library
  • Oct. 26 at 5 p.m. at the Damascus branch library

If you’re a teen and want to talk about the book, check out the Teen Book Club at the Glade Spring branch library. They meet Tuesdays at 4 p.m.

Kids

We have special Big Read story times, LEGOs and crafts for kids at all our libraries. Check out the calendar for specific times and locations.

And… of course we still have lots of other programming going on as well. For instance Sharyn McCrumb will be at the main library Oct. 15 at 3 p.m. We’ve got computer classes, healthy living classes, etc. Come join us!

 

 

 

 


The Big Read is Here

Posted October 3rd, 2017 in Uncategorized

Charles VessThe Big Read returns to Washington County

Here There Be Dragons …

Ursula K. Le Guin’s “A Wizard of Earthsea” is the centerpiece of The Big Read celebration in Washington County, Va. We’ve created six weeks of events celebrating the book. You won’t believe all the things we have planned, but many of you will think this first weekend is awesome!

As usual we start with a party, called the Kick-off, where you’ll have a lot of fun and get goodies for The Big Read. Then our keynote speaker, Charles Vess, speaks Sunday, Oct. 8 at 3 p.m., at the main library. Both of these are going to be wonderful events and we look forward to see you there. More details about each are below.

The Kick-off

The Big Read kicks off with a celebration at Virginia Highlands Community College’s campus commons, Abingdon, Va., Saturday, Oct. 7 from 3-5 p.m. You are invited and encouraged to wear your wizarding finest. In addition to all the fun, you’ll get to see me in a silly hat.

A roving juggler, Craig Lewis from Night Owl Circus entertains with his skill. Sandra Parker, Celtic harpist and vocalist, provides musical entertainment. Poets from the Appalachian Center for Poets and Writers read fantasy-inspired poetry. Robert Pilk from Mountain Empire Comics offers free comics, and cosplayers entertain the crowd.

A mini-book fair offers attendees the chance to meet two local authors, Katie Richardson and Wilma D. Dalton, and purchase their books. Richardson is the author of “Anarchy in America,” a novel that explores the dystopian concept of survival. In a world with no taxes, no welfare, no laws, no police and no restraints, can siblings Luke and Sophia learn the skills to survive? Dalton is the author of “The Dark Side of the Woods.” The dark side of the woods is a place that Sadie walked by daily and thought was perfectly normal. Until she realized, nothing that walked in, walked back out. Curses, wolves, new romance and a gruesome transformation threaten to change everything Sadie has ever known. A Jan-Carol Publishing representative is available with other fantasy novels for sale.

William King Museum of Art offers a craft project for children. There are other games and activities for kids, including temporary dragon tattoos and a wizard hat ring toss.

Dragon cutouts are available for selfies. Door prizes and refreshments are on hand.

Charles Vess: Keynote

Charles Vess takes us on a journey through Earthsea via his new illustrations for the series, Sunday, Oct. 8 at 3 p.m., at the main library in Abingdon. An internationally-acclaimed artist, he is working closely with Le Guin to bring her world to life in a new 50th anniversary edition of her Earthsea series. He gives us a sneak preview of his interpretation of Earthsea and discusses the challenges of bringing someone else’s vision to life.

Vess has exhibited in New York, San Francisco, Atlanta, Spain and Italy, and Abingdon’s William King Museum of Art. He drew 175 illustrations for Neil Gaiman’s “Stardust,” which became a major motion picture, celebrating its 10th anniversary this year. It will be shown Oct. 16 at 7:30 p.m., at the Abingdon Cinemall as part of The Big Read celebration.

He has received many awards including a Locus Award, three World Fantasy Awards for Best Artist and one for Best Short Story, and more. He illustrated for Marvel Comics (including cover art for “The Amazing Spider-Man”), made many contributions to DC Comics (with an 11-issue run as cover artist for “Swamp Thing”), and the “Sandman” series.

 

About The Big Read celebration

The Big Read’s goal is to broaden our understanding of our world, our communities and ourselves through the joy of sharing a good book. Le Guin’s A Wizard of Earthsea” is arguably the most widely admired American fantasy novel of the past 50 years. The book’s elegant diction, geographical sweep and mounting suspense are irresistible. Earthsea—composed of an archipelago of many islands—is a land of the imagination, like Oz, Faerie or the dream-like realm of our unconscious. The novel follows the early life of a boy from a remote village whose magical powers, intelligence and determination get him accepted to wizard school where his pride plunges him into darkness, and he must journey far to face his demon. Le Guin has received the Hugo, Nebula, Locus and World Fantasy awards (each more than once), as well as the National Book Foundation’s Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters and the Library of Congress’s Living Legend Award.

The novel celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2018, when it will be re-issued with new illustrations created by Abingdon’s Charles Vess, who speaks at the library Sunday, Oct. 8 at 3 p.m.

NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. Media sponsors of The Big Read are the Bristol Herald Courier and the Washington County News. A grant from the National Endowment for the Arts administered by Arts Midwest funds the program. Additional funds are provided by the Friends of the Library and the WCPL Foundation.

 


It’s Story Time

Posted August 28th, 2017 in Uncategorized

story time logoStory time and our regular slate of programming for children and teens returns Sept. 5.

Amanda and her crew have blended old and new programs for an exciting line-up.

Returning programs at main library

Story time for babies and toddlers is held at 11 a.m., Mondays at 10 a.m. on Tuesdays. Preschool story time is held Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 11 a.m. Did you know that our staff creates a lesson plan for each week’s story time? Each one has a theme, and the lesson plan includes the stories they’ll read, and the related songs, activities and craft. They even include a prop list. I wish I were that organized.

Lego Play is typically held on the third Wednesday of the month. Please check the calendar on our website before coming. Sometimes holidays necessitate a change in schedule.

The main library’s homeschool activities continue on Wednesdays at 2:30 p.m. We’ll explore a new science, technology, engineering or math them on the first Wednesday of each month. Our popular Lego Play is back on the second Wednesday of the month. A new program is held on the third Wednesday.

New programs at main

We have a new program for homeschoolers at the main library. Join us the third Wednesday of the month for Arts and Crafts at 2:30 p.m.

The main library also hosts a Rubik Cube Competition the second Saturday of the month at 11 a.m. Join us and challenge yourself.

Programs at branch libraries

The Damascus branch library hosts story time the first and third Wednesdays of the month at 10 a.m.

Story time at the Glade Spring branch library is held on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. The Teen Book Club meets Tuesdays at 4 p.m. Kids Create is held on the first Saturday of the month at 1 p.m.

The Hayters Gap branch library holds a STEM program on Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. On Thursdays, they offer Homework Help at 3:30 p.m. If you don’t need help with your homework, they’ll have a fun craft for you to do.

The Mendota branch library holds story time at 10:30 a.m., Sept. 27, Oct. 11, Oct. 18, Oct. 25, Nov. 15, Nov. 29, and  Dec. 13.

We’ll also offer holiday movies and Halloween programs. And, we have loads of special programs for The Big Read in October and November.


Catron speaks at library

Posted August 8th, 2017 in Uncategorized

photo of Mandy CatronHave you ever been in love, wanted to be in love or are you just irritated by all that romance stuff? We’ve got a speaker for you – Mandy Catron, originally from Abingdon. Her book, “How to Fall in Love with Anyone: A Memoir in Essays,” is being talked about as a “must read” for the summer. It’s not what you may think. It’s not one of those “10 ways to make your partner love you” magazine stories. It’s biology, literary theory and psychology mixed with her personal life.

You can find out more by attending her talk at Sinking Spring Presbyterian Church in Abingdon, Sunday Aug. 27 at 3 p.m. You can also buy her book and get her autograph after the talk.

About the Book

What really makes love last? Does love ever work the way we say it does in movies and books and Facebook posts? Or does obsessing over those love stories hurt our real-life relationships? When her parents divorced after a 28-year marriage and her own 10-year relationship ended, those were the questions that Catron wanted to answer.

The book explores the romantic myths we create and explains how they limit our ability to achieve and sustain intimacy. She takes a closer look at what it means to love someone, be loved and how we present our love to the world. She delves all the way back to 1944, when her grandparents first met in a coal mining town, to her own dating life as a professor in Vancouver, drawing insights from her fascinating research into the universal psychology, biology, history and literature of love.

Catron uses biologists’ research into dopamine triggers to ask whether the need to love is an innate human drive. She uses literary theory to show why we prefer certain kinds of love stories. She urges us to question the unwritten scripts we follow in relationships, and she looks into where those scripts come from in the first place. And she tells the story of how she decided to test a psychology experiment that she’d read about — where the goal was to create intimacy between strangers using a list of 36 questions — and ended up in the surreal situation of having millions of people following her brand-new relationship.
About Catron
Catron lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, where she teaches English and creative writing at the University of British Columbia.

Catron’s writing has appeared in The New York Times and The Washington Post, as well as literary journals and anthologies. Her TEDx talks can be found at TED.com. She writes about love and love stories at The Love Story Project (TheLoveStoryProject.ca). Her article “To Fall in Love with Anyone, Do This” was one of the most popular articles published by The New York Times in 2015.

Catron is the daughter of Bo Catron and Rita Marceron.

This event is sponsored by the Friends of the Washington County Public Library.


It’s Book Sale Time

Posted July 27th, 2017 in Uncategorized

photo of main library with book sale bannerThere are only a few things I like better than a book that’s an old friend. One of them is a book that becomes a new friend, and another is a bargain. So, you can imagine how much I love our Friends’ book sales. Combine books and bargains, and I’m ecstatic.

The Friends have been working for months to pick out the best books and other materials for their big Festival Book Sale, and the time draws nigh.

When you come through the doors into the conference room at the main library in Abingdon you’ll find a huge selection. If you’re a book lover, you’ll think you’ve walked into Aladdin’s Cave. Even better . . . they bring new books every day.

The Friends have picked out thousands of books, including popular fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, romance, reference, cooking, gardening, classics, inspirational as well as books for children of all ages. There’s also a collector’s section filled with vintage and out-of-print books. A selection of DVDs, audiobooks and CDs is available.

Prices

Talk about bargains … prices range from 50 cents to $2 for most offerings. Just wait until you see the cost for popular fiction and mysteries – buy two and get one free. How can you go wrong? Collector and coffee-table books, DVDs and CDs are specially priced. FOL canvas tote bags are available for $10.

Book Sale Hours

The fun begins Thursday, July 27 from 5-8 p.m., with the Friends Preview Night. Preview Night is for members of the Friends of the Library only. Not a member? Not a problem. You can get your membership at the door for $10. And they serve refreshments.

The sale runs from Friday, July 28 through Sunday, Aug. 6. Friday and Saturday hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday hours are 1-5 p.m. The popular bag sale is held Sunday, Aug. 6 when a bag of books is $5.

MasterCard, Visa and Discovery are accepted.

All proceeds of this sale support programs and services of the Washington County Public Library System.

 


WCPL receives Big Read grant

Posted July 9th, 2017 in Uncategorized

NEA Big Read‘A Wizard of Earthsea’ to be celebrated during The Big Read

We are so excited that we received a $15,000 grant to host The Big Read in Washington County. A program of the National Endowment for the Arts, The Big Read broadens understanding of the world, communities and ourselves through the joy of sharing a good book. Managed by Arts Midwest, this initiative offers grants to support innovative community reading programs designed around a single book.

WCPL is the only organization in Virginia to receive a grant to host a Big Read project. Grants were made to 75 non-profit groups, ranging from schools to libraries to arts organizations.

“Through the NEA Big Read, we are bringing contemporary works to communities across the country, helping us better understand the diverse voices and perspectives that come with it,” said NEA Chairman Jane Chu. “These 75 organizations have developed unique plans to celebrate these works, including numerous opportunities for exploration and conversation.

The Book

The Big Read in Washington County focuses on “A Wizard of Earthsea” by Ursula Le Guin. Activities begin with a kick-off celebration Oct. 7.

Set in the fictional archipelago of Earthsea, the story centers around a young mage named Ged, born in a village on the island Gont. Displaying great power while still a boy, he joins the school of wizardry, where his prickly nature drives him into conflict with one of his fellows. During a magical duel, Ged’s spell goes awry and releases a shadow creature that attacks him. The novel follows his journey as he seeks to be free of the creature.

The book has often been described as a coming of age story, as it explores Ged learning to cope with power and come to terms with death. The novel also carries Taoist themes about a fundamental balance in the universe of Earthsea, which wizards are supposed to maintain.

Local artist Charles Vess, who is an internationally-acclaimed fantasy illustrator, is creating new illustrations for the book’s 50th anniversary release next year.

The Partners

WCPL is working with several partners to expand the offerings for the community. They include Charles Vess, the Symphony of the Mountains, William King Museum of Art, Arts Array, College of Older Adults, the local school system, local arts organizations, Abingdon Cinemall and Appalachian Poets and Writers. The Bristol Herald Courier and The Washington County News are media sponsors.

Activities

We don’t have specific dates and times nailed down for many of the events yet. But we have some awesome fun planned.

Some of the plans include:

  • Kick-off Celebration (free books, juggler, book fair and more)
  • Keynote Speaker: Charles Vess
  • The Symphony of the Mountains performs scenes from “Fantasia”
  • A Science Fiction and Fantasy Writing workshop
  • Crafts and story time
  • Upscaling books
  • NY Times bestselling writer Jennifer Estep
  • Tai Chi
  • Naturopathy
  • Fantasy Film Series
  • Brian & Marie Bridgeforth
  • William King Museum workshops
  • Lectures of Birds of Prey
  • And more …

 

About the National Endowment for the Arts
Established by Congress in 1965, the National Endowment for the Arts is the independent federal agency whose funding and support gives Americans the opportunity to participate in the arts, exercise their imaginations and develop their creative capacities. Through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies and the philanthropic sector, the NEA supports arts learning, affirms and celebrates America’s rich and diverse cultural heritage and extends its work to promote equal access to the arts in every community across America. Visit arts.gov to learn more about NEA.

About Arts Midwest
Arts Midwest promotes creativity, nurtures cultural leadership and engages people in meaningful arts experiences, bringing vitality to Midwest communities and enriching people’s lives. Based in Minneapolis, Arts Midwest connects the arts to audiences throughout the nine-state region of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. One of six non-profit regional arts organizations in the United States, Arts Midwest’s history spans more than 25 years. For more information, visit artsmidwest.org.


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